Hillendale Home Care is licensed by the State of California to provide Certified Nursing training courses for Contra Costa and Alameda Counties.

How to Tell if a Senior Is Suffering from Loss of Vision

loss of visionDiscussing health issues can be tough for seniors. They may feel that their health is private, or they might be fearful that admitting that they have a problem will lead to loss of independence. This is often the case when it comes to vision loss.

A senior who is suffering from loss of vision may do her best to hide the issue from family and friends. For family and friends, it is helpful to know how to identify changes in behavior and appearance that might indicate a senior should visit her doctor or eye care professional. Keep an eye out for these red flags that could be symptoms of vision loss:

  • Bumping into objects, tripping, moving very carefully or touching the wall while walking
  • Visual confusion (i.e. not recognizing buildings, landmarks, houses, etc.) in a familiar place
  • Under-reaching or over-reaching for objects
  • Ceasing enjoyable activities such as reading, watching TV, driving, walking, or participating in hobbies
  • Tilting the head or squinting to see, or holding reading material close to the face
  • Struggling to identify faces, objects or colors
  • Stained clothing or outfit color combinations that do not match
  • Seeking out more or different kinds of lighting for reading or other activities
  • Having trouble cutting or serving food, or knocking over objects in the kitchen or on the table

Additionally, if the senior complains about the following, it could be a sign of vision loss:

  • Halos or rings around lights, or seeing spots
  • Eye pain
  • Reduced night vision, double or distorted vision

Loss of vision doesn’t have to mean loss of independence. As a Hillendale Home Care provider, you can help seniors with vision loss live safer and more independent lives. If you would like to learn more about becoming a Hillendale Home Care CNA, click here for more information.

Getting Creative with Colors to Help Clients with Low Vision

low visionPerhaps of all our senses, vision is the one we appreciate the most. So much of what we experience in the world around us comes through what we see. Our vision also serves to help enhance our safety. Compromised vision can make it more difficult to see dangers and obstacles as we navigate the world around us, both inside and outside of the home.

If you are caregiving for a client who struggles with reduced vision – also known as low vision – strategic use of colors and contrasts can enhance his or her safety and independence. It’s not as difficult as it might seem. Basically:

  • Bright, solid colors like orange, red, and yellow reflect the most light and thus are easiest to see.
  • Light-colored objects placed against darker backgrounds provide better contrast. For example, placing a white sheet of paper on a brown desktop stands out more than on a tan surface.
  • Likewise, dark objects are easier to see against light backgrounds. A dark colored chair will stand out best against light colored walls.
  • When arranging furniture and other objects in a room, bear in mind that some colors are so similar that distinguishing between them can be difficult. The most common problem color groups are:
    • Navy blue, black and brown
    • Blue, purple and green
    • Pink, pale green and yellow
  • Placing light-reflecting tape or bright paint on the leading edge of the first and last steps helps them stand out.
  • Hallway runners in solid, bright colors help to clearly define walking spaces.

Naturally, prior to making any changes in the home of an older adult with low vision, it’s essential to keep that person’s feelings and wishes in mind. Someone dealing with vision loss is likely to be struggling through a variety of fears, including a lowered sense of control over his or her life, fear of losing independence and privacy, and concern that others may view him or her differently. He or she may also be experiencing feelings of being overwhelmed or anxious about the future and reluctant to share thoughts. Being sensitive to these feelings instead of simply dismissing them can make a tremendous impact.

If you are interested in helping seniors with low vision to enjoy a higher quality of life, contact Hillendale Home Care of Walnut Creek, California. We fully support our caregiving team through ongoing training and CEU offerings to help you keep your CNA or HHA license current. Contact us any time to learn more by calling 925-933-8181.