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Archives for October 2018

Tips to Best Help a Person Following a Traumatic Brain Injury

Help those recovering from a traumatic brain injury with these tips

Providing care for someone who’s struggling with the effects of a traumatic brain injury can be more manageable with compassion combined with education. The following tips can help reduce stress and frustration for both the person for whom you’re providing care, as well as for yourself as a caregiver.

  • Allow Plenty of Time for Recovery: Recovery for someone with a TBI (traumatic brain injury) very often can take years. Although the person may seem to be recovered on the outside, there will naturally be some days that are better than others, and pushing the person too hard can lead to setbacks. Remain patient and refrain from negativity.
  • View Things Differently: Try to imagine yourself in the shoes of the person with the TBI, and view the situation through his or her eyes and abilities.
  • Focus on Structure: A structured day is often crucial to the person’s recovery. It can help the individual retrain his or her brain and know better what to expect during the course of the day.
  • Patience Is Key: Allowing the person to manage tasks at his or her own pace will help the individual regain independence. Offer plenty of patience in listening, enabling the person to finish what he or she wants to say without interruption, even if it takes some time to find the correct words. This will help him or her to relearn important language skills.
  • Help, But Don’t Do Everything: If the person appears to be “stuck” in a task or is repeating actions, he or she could just require a little assistance with processing information. Refrain from taking over the task, and instead offer simple suggestions. Often, people with brain injuries will find that they need to finish a task in a very set order as the brain is being retrained.
  • Rest Is Best: A person with a TBI requires more rest than usual, and this is not a condition of laziness. It causes fatigue for the person to process and organize thoughts, particularly if already tired.
  • Remain Alert in Social Settings: Parties and crowds can be particularly challenging, with various conversations and loud noises occurring all at once. Be mindful that it may be too much for the person to process and a break can be beneficial.
  • Never Treat the Individual like a Child: Be sure you never talk down to the TBI survivor. Although you may be trying to help, it can appear to be belittling.
  • Behavior Management: It’s vital to figure out what triggered a challenging behavior. Was the person tired? Was there too much noise or chaos that resulted in anxiety? Was a particular routine broken? If at all possible, avoid those triggers to help prevent the problematic behaviors.
  • Be Prepared for Strong Emotions: Understand that the person may become more irritated or frustrated, or could be more sensitive than before the TBI. Keep in mind that many things which could formerly be done without a second thought now require a great deal of effort to accomplish.
  • Provide Hope and Encouragement: Celebrate each accomplishment with the individual. Each moment of progress, regardless of how small, is a victory. New discoveries and stories of healing are happening each and every day. No one individual’s recovery is exactly like another.

Be sure to note any changes in condition in someone with a traumatic brain injury so they can be relayed to the person’s doctor immediately.

If you’d like to learn more about joining the Hillendale team as a CNA, contact our CNA and HHA School by completing this simple form!